Sake

Sake, also spelled saki is a Japanese alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice. It is light in colour, the basic product is noncarbonated, has a sweet flavour, and contains up to 18 percent alcohol.

Sake is often mistakenly called a wine because of its appearance and alcoholic content; people refer to it as a "Rice Wine" but this is technically incorrect.  It is actually made in a two-step process similar to that for brewing beer.  Special strains of rice are precisely milled to remove the outer layers, a process that reduces the grain to 50–70 percent of its original size.

Production begins with a preparation of steamed rice "koji" and a mold that converts the rice starch to fermentable sugars. The koji, mixed with water and fresh steamed rice, is kneaded (traditionally by hand) into a smooth paste and placed in a vat with more rice and water.

This mixture is allowed to ferment for about four weeks with sake yeast and then becomes what is called "moto", with an alcoholic content of about 11 percent. More koji, steamed rice, and water are added to the vat, and a second fermentation begins, lasting about seven days.  After resting for another week, the sake is filtered, pasteurized, and bottled. Alcohol may be added to the desired level.

In Japan, where it is the national beverage, sake is served with special ceremony. Before being served, it is warmed in a small earthenware or porcelain bottle called a tokkuri; it is usually sipped from a small porcelain cup called a sakazuki. Premium sake, of a delicate flavour, is served cold or on ice. Sake is best when consumed less than a year after bottling.

The manufacture of sake began sometime after the introduction of wet rice cultivation in Japan in the 3rd century bc. The first written record referring to sake dates from the 3rd century ad, and the first reference to its manufacture dates from the 8th century. In ancient Japan sake was produced primarily by the imperial court and by large temples and shrines, but from the early 12th century the general population began to manufacture it. By the early 16th century the modern process for making sake had been nearly perfected.

Sake is the drink of the kami (gods) of Shintō, the indigenous Japanese religion. It is drunk at festivals and is included in offerings to the kami. At a Shintō wedding the bridal couple perform a ceremony of drinking sake from lacquer cups. 

From: http://www.britannica.com/topic/sake 

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